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Alcohol Facts to Tell Your Kids

Kids who start drinking in their teens are more likely to turn into alcoholics than those who start drinking later in life. No parent wants their kid to be an alcoholic. And no parent knows whether or not their kid, once they’ve started drinking, will become one. So, what can you do?

Do you want them to never start drinking at all? Is it okay with you that they drink as long as they don’t go overboard? You have to decide on a strategy and make plans for your kid – even at an early age. What is your position on alcohol?

The problem with figuring this out is that you don’t know what kind of drinker your son or daughter is likely to become.

There are drinkers and then there are drinkers. The first kind of drinker drinks only socially, doesn’t drink a lot, doesn’t get drunk and drinking doesn’t get them into trouble.

The second kind of drinker loses friends, relationships, jobs, money, has accidents, gets sick, and likely dies sooner than they should have. That kind of drinker also tends to cause problems, worries, frustration and anxiety for their friends, family, co-workers, other associates, and so on. They might also get into car accidents or otherwise endanger their own lives and the lives of others. And they might also cause another type of physical pain – almost all domestic violence is associated with drinking.

Which kind of drinker will your son or daughter be?

Truth be told – you just don’t know. Whether or not someone becomes an alcoholic is virtually impossible to predict.

So, your best bet is to give them all the education you can about the problems connected to drinking.

Where Do You Start Talking to Your Kids About Alcohol?

You start with the paragraph above: “The second kind of drinker loses friends, relationships, jobs, money, has accidents, gets sick, and likely dies sooner than they should have. That kind of drinker also tends to cause problems, worries, frustration and anxiety for their friends, family, co-workers, other associates, and so on. They might also get into car accidents or otherwise endanger their own lives and the lives of others. And they might also cause another type of physical pain – almost all domestic violence is associated with drinking.”

Sometimes kids think they’re immune to all that stuff. But the truth is that they are not. They have no idea how their body, their brain, their metabolism, etc., is going to react. Also, point out to them that they’d have a hard time finding someone who got into a lot of trouble with drinking who actually thought that is what would happen if they started. Of course they thought the same thing – that could never happen to me. But they don’t know that.

Here are a few more facts:

  • One in five people who try to stop drinking on their own die during withdrawal.
  • More than two thirds of people who go to the ER go there because of something connected with alcohol.
  • One in five people who kill themselves are drinkers.

Not a very good track record, is it? Alcohol really doesn’t have much to recommend it.

It’s best to talk to your kids early on. If ‘early on’ has already passed by, and they’re already drinking, educate them anyway. And if they won’t or can’t stop (same thing), get them alcohol addiction help. You will save them, and a lot of other people, including yourself, a lot of pain and sorrow.

 

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