Find Drug Addiction Treatment

Talk to a drug addiction treatment advisor:  855-889-0555

Blog Post

Crystal Meth: Not for Weight Loss!

We just read a story in the news that reported a REALLY strange and depressing statistic. Something like 30 percent of female meth addicts are risking their lives, physically and even legally, by abusing one of the worst illegal drugs ever invented to achieve something called “body image”.

The study that revealed that information, from the Burnet Institute of Medical Research in Australia, found that weight loss is a key factor in abusing meth. Meanwhile, a Canadian addiction specialist has found the same situation in Western Canada. He says 30 percent of the female meth abusers he sees in Vancouver are using it to control their weight.

In other words, the fashion industry’s propaganda about what a female should look like to be acceptable is driving women to expose themselves to a vicious, illegal drug.

There are a couple of important factors involved in this sad scenario:

1. Trying to achieve some bogus “body image” propaganda has become a serious epidemic in America today. It’s almost as serious as drug abuse itself, because it’s affecting the lives of countless thousands of young women, adolescents and even pre-adolescents.

2. Using methamphetamine to achieve some bogus “body image” is a bad idea. But using methamphetamine in any form, for any reason at all, is a REALLY bad idea right from the get-go.

You’ve heard that crystal meth, or ice as it’s often called, is nasty stuff. If you watched the immensely popular TV series “Breaking Bad”, you have an idea of what meth can do to human beings. Yet in towns and cities across America, women are using this fiercely dangerous drug to lose a few dress sizes.

Methamphetamine is still prescribed now and then by doctors for weight control. It does reduce appetites, and the body does lose some weight. But as soon as you quit using the drug, the body starts packing on the pounds again, usually worse than before. Ex-addicts usually gain more weight than they lost while on the drug. This drives them back to the drug, and the cycle continues.

The real face of meth is much uglier than most people realize. Before-and-after meth mug shots on the internet are terrifying – dry, cracked and sagging skin, covered with the nastiest open sores you’ve ever seen, rotten and missing teeth, straggly hair and baggy vacant eyes. How anyone can reconcile such appearance with an improvement in “body image” is a mystery.

We all know that fashion magazines sell body-image dreams packaged in needless, overpriced products. We also know that body image has nothing to do with being healthy, intelligent and creative. And if you look around at all the happily married couples who don’t look like movie stars, idealistic body image doesn’t have a whole lot to do with being interesting to the opposite sex either.

Yet according to Education.com, anywhere from 50% to as high as 70% of school girls with healthy weight consider themselves to be overweight. Among 5th to 12th grade girls, 47% say they want to lose weight because of magazine pictures. Self-esteem peaks at about 9 years old and “then begins to plummet.” And this is bad news, the website says, because “poor body image” can lead to poor self-esteem, depression, and eating disorders.

So guess where else it leads? That’s right, crystal meth.

If you have school-age daughters, or you know someone who does, pass this info along. Help them see the truth about fashion mags and this bogus body-image drivel. And if they seem desperate, get them to a healthcare specialist who can help them determine if they really are overweight, help them find out why, and put them on a proper program that will help them fix their health issues. And do educate them about meth – show them those internet pix. We’ve include one here, courtesy of the Multnomah County Sherrif office.

If someone is already in trouble with meth, call 877-554-7380. We’ll help you find a good addiction help program.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *